How do you test a motorcycle ignition with a multimeter?

How do I know if my ignition coil is getting power?

Locate the positive or power wire attached to the engine coil. Check for power using a test light. If this wire has no power, then your ignition coil is not receiving current. You should check the wiring from your ignition switch to the coil for breaks in the wire and repair them.

How many ohms should a ignition coil have?

A typical value would read 0.4 – 2 ohms.

How do you check an ignition coil with a multimeter?

Insert one of the multimeter’s probes into the center opening of the coil, contacting the metal terminal inside the coil. Touch the second probe of the meter to the ignition coil’s grounding terminal. The meter should read 6,000 to 15,000 ohms. If it does not, the coil’s secondary winding is faulty.

How do you diagnose ignition problems?

Here’s How To Diagnose Your Ignition Issues

  1. Verify Lack of Spark. …
  2. Check for Any Obvious Issues. …
  3. Probe for Power. …
  4. Double-Check Firing Order. …
  5. Double-Check Initial Timing. …
  6. Test/Inspect Spark Plugs. …
  7. Test Spark Plug Wires. …
  8. Check for Spark at Coil.

What should ignition coil read?

Most ignition coils should have a primary resistance falling somewhere between 0.4 and 2 ohms; however, refer to your manufacturer’s specifications for the correct reading. If a reading of zero is displayed, that signifies that the ignition coil has shorted internally in the primary windings and needs to be replaced.

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Why is my motorcycle not getting any spark?

Having no spark at the spark plugs is one of the most common reasons why a motorcycle won’t start. A no spark condition can also be one of the most frustrating starting issues on a bike. … Remember, you need four things to make your bike run: air, fuel, spark and compression.

Why is there no spark at the spark plug?

Loss of spark is caused by anything that prevents coil voltage from jumping the electrode gap at the end of the spark plug. This includes worn, fouled or damaged spark plugs, bad plug wires or a cracked distributor cap.